Hispanic Woman Survives 2 Strokes and Colon Cancer

Belinda De La Rosa was driving to a doctor’s appointment for what she thought was tennis elbow. A nagging pain in her left arm had been bothering her for days.

Stroke and cancer survivor Belinda De La Rosa with, from left, her husband Joe and sons Michael and Jonathan. (Photo courtesy of Belinda De La Rosa)

Stroke and cancer survivor Belinda De La Rosa with, from left, her husband Joe and sons Michael and Jonathan. (Photo courtesy of Belinda De La Rosa)

She happened to be passing a hospital on that day in 1997 when the pain turned to numbness that spread from her left arm to her neck and face, a classic symptom of stroke. She went directly to the emergency room.

Testing showed De La Rosa, then 41, was having a clot-caused ischemic stroke. Doctors discovered she had an undiagnosed autoimmune condition called antiphospholipid syndrome, which can cause the body to form blood clots.

To help prevent another stroke, she started taking a blood thinner and medication for previously undiagnosed high blood pressure. She struggled for months with weakness on her left side, causing her leg to drag as she walked, and her face drooped slightly.

Her sons were 5 and 12 at the time, and De La Rosa poured herself into taking care of them to take her mind off the trauma of the experience.

“I had so much anxiety,” she said. “I would wake up screaming, ‘I don’t want to die.’”

Stroke is the nation’s No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of disability. Although the rate of stroke deaths among U.S. adults fell 38 percent between 2000 and 2015, that pace slowed or reversed in most states from 2013 to 2015, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

African-Americans are most likely to die from stroke, but among Hispanics, stroke death rates rose 5.8 percent each year from 2013 to 2015, the report said.

Mitchell S.V. Elkind, M.D., a professor of neurology and epidemiology at Columbia University, said the increasing death rates signal the importance of raising awareness about stroke risks, but also the need to look at other factors that may play a role, such as access to care or healthy foods.